Tag Archives: Uber

Shervin Pishevar likens current tech monopolies to old-growth forests that need controlled burning

With the recent death of Paul Allen at the age of 65, some may say that the era of Microsoft itself may be reaching some sort of terminus. The company that Allen and Bill Gates founded is, in some ways, more powerful than ever. But there has been a lingering feeling for the past few years that the firm may be losing its nimble touch. Programs like Windows 10 have been declared disasters in some circles, with many users expressing deep dissatisfaction with the product. At the same time, others have voiced deep concerns about the extent to which the company has been taken over at nearly all levels of upper management by high-level professionals from South Asia. Accusations of ethnic nepotism and even reverse racism have floated around the internet for a long time. Now, some of those accusations are coming to a head.

But these problems are hardly limited to Microsoft, says Shervin Pishevar. Apple, Google, Facebook and Amazon have all endured their fair share of controversies over the last few years, including some serious questions about all of those companies’ ability to continue innovating and providing the market with what it wants. In particular, both Google and Facebook have suffered serious and potentially highly damaging criticisms about their fundamental business models, particularly, the effectiveness of their advertising systems and to what extent genuine ROI on advertising spending is even really possible.

And none of this comes as any surprise to Shervin Pishevar. Shervin Pishevar is one of the most renowned venture capitalists in Silicon Valley. He has also been one of the most vocal critics of the Big Five tech monopolies for at least the last decade, warning repeatedly and loudly about the potential consequences to the U.S. economy and the San Francisco Bay Area, in particular, that will be the result of allowing iron-fist monopolies to continue to dominate such large segments of the tech markets.

Shervin Pishevar has stated unambiguously that allowing companies like Google and Facebook to control so much of the internet’s advertising system will cause innovative stasis that may eventually lead to the broad lack of competitiveness of the entire U.S. tech economy.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GdIlKLX5Pn8

Shervin Pishevar: Eradication of middlemen is key to frictionless economy

Shervin Pishevar is not yet a household name. But the 44-year-old entrepreneur has become a legend within certain tech circles. He is one of the most renowned venture capitalists in Silicon Valley, having been behind the formation of Virgin Hyperloop, Airbnb, Uber and Social Gaming Network.

But Shervin Pishevar has gained even more fame due to his massive social media presence. The venture capitalist operates one of the most popular Twitter feeds of anyone in the tech world, with more than 100,000 of the most influential people in the field hanging on his every tweeted word. Shervin Pishevar regularly tweets about some of the most important topics facing the nation today.

In a recent 21-hour tweet storm, Shervin Pishevar talked about how the economy of the United States could be improved in the future. He has long been a staunch critic of both excessive government interference in free markets and of too much monopoly power within the tech world. While this may seem like a sort of contradiction due to the fact that it requires government power to break up monopoly power, Pishevar believes that it is not. In fact, the very thing that defines monopolies are the increasing taking on of characteristics and levels of power normally only seen with government institutions. In this sense, says Pishevar, monopolies themselves are a form of government, with even less responsiveness to the public than democratic government institutions.

Regardless of the philosophic underpinnings, Pishevar’s ideas on what implications all of this has for the U.S. economy going forward are fairly simple. He believes that both governments and monopolies are two subtypes of a larger phenomenon that is almost always friction-creating, extractive and wealth-destroying in nature: the middleman.

Government acts as a middleman by taxing consumers, businesses and employees and by constantly interjecting in otherwise free transactions through the imposition of tariffs, regulations and laws. Monopolies fit into this framework a bit more subtly. But they essentially act as friction-creating middlemen when they engage in all of the same activities that define middlemen, namely, extractive rent seeking, creation of inefficiencies and the erection of barriers to entry.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=geCtCov15g4